Bank Workouts

While negotiating debt workouts with banks in the last few months, I’ve noticed a number of clients coming into my office with a significant financial problem: the bank has a lien on all of their assets, and they don’t have the cash flow to ensure that everyone gets paid, including the landlord, the bank, and other general creditors.

In these situations an old saying by Donald Trump seems appropriate: “When you owe the bank 1 million bucks and can’t pay it, you have a problem. When you own the bank 10 million bucks and you can’t pay it, the bank has a problem.” In other words, when cash flow is tight, the entrepreneur needs everyone involved to work with him.

Of course, if everyone can work together, the hard-working entrepreneur can pull his way out of a slump. However, sometimes in such a situation despair can set in, and the entrepreneur becomes filled with apathy, losing his drive. The obvious solution is to give the debtor a little breathing room, so that he can get back to focusing on what’s most important to resolving their financial issues: cash flow.

In a number of recent situations, my first approach was to sit with the bank, once learning they had collateral and all the assets of the business. This may seem like a precarious or risky position, but actually it is to the small businessman’s benefit. When the bank has the first claim on all the assets, there is nothing to fear from general creditors, who have no claim on assets due to the fact the debt is unsecured. As you can see, keeping the bank happy is critical.

But just because the bank is happy doesn’t mean the debtor’s problems are over. The debtor must continue to work hard, and work steadily. Creditors need to be alerted to the fact that bankruptcy is possible, if workout discussions are not productive for all parties. The debtor’s attorney will need to handle all lawsuits, and everyone involved needs to be given enough information to understand exactly what’s going on.

Are you worried about these kinds of issues? Call me on my small-business hotline, to discuss these matters, or schedule a consultation in the office by calling (317) 266-8888. We will try our best to get to the bottom of your issues, and help you to solve them quickly with minimal aggravation.